Recents in Beach

How to express opinions, agreeing, and disagreeing

This lesson aims to teach you how to express opinions, agreeing, and disagreeing with exercises and quizzes

How to express opinionsagreeing

and disagreeing



Asking someone for their opinion


• What do you think of his new book?

• How do you feel about working with the others?

• What are your feelings about the change in the timetable?

• What's your honest opinion of that painting?


Giving your opinion


• I think Charles had the best idea.

• I don't think he knew very much about the subject.

• Personally, I think his first book is terrible.

• In my opinion, we should sell the old use and buy a new one.

• As far as I'm concerned the whole evening was a waste of time.

Note:

• If you want to say something isn't a good idea, you make 'think' negative:
  I don't think it's a good idea. (NOT I think it's not a good idea)

Personally and As far as I'm concerned are more common in spoken English.

As far as I'm concerned can mean, 'this is my opinion and I don't care what others
  think'.


Giving the opinion of others



• According to one of the journalists on television (= in the opinion of this journalist), the
Prime Minister knew nothing about it.

• The newspaper says that the Prime Minister knew weeks ago.

Note:

• we still use the verb say when referring to a written opinion


Agreeing with someone


• We often agree by continuing with the same opinion or adding to it.

A: I think we should concentrate on this one project.
B: Yes, it's better to do one thing well than two things badly.

• But if we want to make it clear we agree, we can use these expressions:

Yes, I agree (with you). (Note: agree is a verb in English. (Not I am agree)
Yes, I think you're right.


Disagreeing with someone



It is very common in English to begin with a short expression of agreement, and then give a
different opinion. Here are some expressions used to introduce the disagreement:

• Yes, perhaps, but don't you think......

• Yes, that's true, but I'm not sure that.....

• Yes, you could be right, but don't forget....

If you disagree strongly with someone you can say : I'm afraid I totally disagree (with you).

Note:

When we want to disagree but not completely, we can use these phrases:

Yes, I partly agree (with you), but ...
I agree to some extent / a certain extent, but ...


Quiz


Test your knowledge now by passing this test from here:



Exercises



Complete these sentences in at least three different ways to ask people their opinion.


1. ................................................. the proposed changes?

2. ................................................. the new building?

3. ................................................. the transport system?

4. ................................................. he new divorce law?

5. ................................................. the government's decision to make parents responsible?


Fill the gaps with the correct word. (One word only.)


1. A: What did you think ........... it?
    B: Well, I didn't like it.

2. .................... to the radio, we won't know the result until tomorrow morning.

3. I agreed with him to a certain ...................

4. As far as I'm ..................., we need to buy a new photocopier immediately.

5. I'm afraid I ..................... disagree with you.


Rewrite these sentences without using the underlined words and phrases. The meaning must stay the same.


1. In my opinion you can't learn a language in three months.
............................................................

2. I think the Club needs to buy new players.
............................................................

3. Yes, I think you're right.
............................................................

4. According to the newspaper, terrorists started the fire.
............................................................

5. I agree with her to some extent
............................................................


Continue these short conversations. You can either agree with the point of view and add to the argument; or introduce a different point of view. 

If you introduce a different point of view, remember to start with a short expression of agreement first.


1. A: A lot of women are quite happy to stay at home and be housewives.
    B: ............................................................

2. A: The state shouldn't give money to people who don't want to work.
    B: ............................................................

3. A: People from developing countries need all the help we can give them.
    B: ............................................................

4. A: We should think about legalising cannabis.
    B: ............................................................

5. A: It can be very dangerous if people become too nationalistic.
    B: ............................................................

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